Tag Archives: Deep Foundations

Recent Project Photos – (or) What have we been up to the last few months (Part 2)?……Driven Piles!

Who says we only work on drilled shafts??  Robert had the opportunity to work for Kiewit Engineering Company providing geotechnical engineering support to Gulf Intracoastal Constructors (GIC), a joint venture of Kiewit and Traylor Brothers on the  Gulf Intracoastal Waterway West Closure Project near Belle Chase, Louisiana.  The project is part of the overall flood protection system improvements that are supposed to protect New Orleans from future hurricanes.  The key components of this particular project are a massive gate and pump station across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.  Go For more information on the project, go here, here, and here (video from Corps of Engineers).

Robert spent a good part of the summer in New Orleans doing a variety of geotechnical engineering tasks to support the construction efforts of GIC.  The main thing he worked on was the test pile program.  The project included a massive test pile program with 24 test piles spread among 5 test sites with various combinations of dynamic, static axial, static tension, and static lateral tests.  The piles were mostly open-ended steel pipe piles varying from 18” to 54” in diameter.  A few 18” x 18” pre-stressed precast concrete piles were also thrown in for good measure.   In addition to performing drivability studies and evaluating tests data, Robert got to spend some time in the wonderful June and July weather in southern Louisiana on the site observing pile installation and testing.  And as always, he came back with a lot of pictures.  Here are a few to enjoy.

Recent Project Photos – (or) What have we been up to the last few months (Part 1)?…… Drilled Shafts!

If you frequent this blog, you have noticed that posts have been rare the last few months.  That is mostly to my being in the field a lot this summer and very busy on lost of projects.  While that is good, it meant I did not have time for updates.  Below are some slide shows from a few drilled shaft projects we worked on this summer.

 

Garden State Parkway Mullica River Bridge, New Jersey – Test Shaft Installation

Paul took a trip to lovely New Jersey to observe a large diameter test shaft on the Mullica River Bridge.  DBA worked as a consultant for Parsons Brinckerhoff on an 8-foot diameter, 220-foot deep test shaft.  CASE was the drilled shaft contractor and Agate was the general contractor.  DBA consulted on the design of the test shaft program, as well as the use of Self Consolidating Concrete (SCC).

 

 

Drilled Shaft Lateral Load Test Research with the University of Kansas

Paul took a ride out west to Kansas City, Kansas (close to home!) to observe a drilled shaft lateral load test in Wyandotte County, near the Cabela’s store on I-435.  The test is part of ongoing research by the University of Kansas for the Kansas DOT.   DBA was involved in previous research concerning laterally loaded shafts behind MSE walls (see previous post, click here for more information on the project).  This research continues on the same theme of investigating the behavior of laterally loaded shafts socketed into the sedimentary rocks in eastern Kansas.  DBA does not have an active role in this project, just an academic interest. 

 

 

 

Huey P. Long Bridge Improvements, New Orleans, Louisiana – Test Shaft Installation

The Huey P. Long Bridge in New Orleans (built in the 1930s) is undergoing a major rehab and expansion.  The vehicle traffic will increase from 2 9-foot lanes in each direction to 3 11-foot lanes in each direction.  This is a very interesting combined highway and railroad bridge with a fascinating history.  The bridge is actually a private bridge owned by the New Orleans Public Belt Railway (click the link to see some cool photos from the construction of the bridge in the 1930s). The project website is here. 

DBA was consulting with the joint venture building the bridge for the base-grouted drilled shafts under one new pier.  A test-shaft was built and tested with O-cells.  Robert was on site while they excavated the test shaft.  Steve was on site during grouting.

Another Legend Passes – Dr. Lymon C. Reese

I wanted to make a quick post on the passing of Dr. Lymon Reese – Dan’s mentor, Ph.D. advisor, and a great engineer.  I’ll post more later as it becomes available. (and catch up posts on our normal activities that I am way behind on).  Below is from an e-mail sent by the ADSC.

 

Drilled Shaft Foundation Industry Giant

Dr. Lymon C. Reese Passes

       Drilled Shaft Foundation Industry Giant  Dr. Lymon C. Reese Passes

We are sad to report that Dr. Lymon C. Reese, Professor Emeritus, University of Texas, Austin, and one of the world’s leading drilled foundation experts, passed away on Monday, September 13, 2009. Dr. Reese was an ADSC Honorary Technical Affiliate Member and a great friend to the ADSC and to the drilled foundation industry. His seminal drilled shaft foundation research conducted for the Texas Department of Transportation and his subsequent writings are among the most important work ever conducted in the field. His graduate students have achieved international acclaim in their own right, and include: Dr. Michael W. O’Neill (deceased), Dr. Dan A. Brown, Larry Olson, Dr. Magued Iskander, Dr. James Long, and many others, all of whom have had a major impact on the advancement of the drilled shaft foundation industry. Dr. Reese was one of the last surviving early “giants” of our industry. At age 92, he remained a vibrant contributor to the profession. To say he will be sorely missed is an understatement. We have lost a most beloved friend.

Further details regarding a Memorial Service will be posted on the ADSC website as they become available.

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Biloxi Bay Bridge Test Pile Program – DFI Journal Volume 3, May 2009

Robert’s paper with Lloyd Held (retired from Eustis Engineering) and Steve Saye of Kiewit Engineering Company on the Biloxi Bay Bridge test pile program has been published in the latest issue of the DFI Journal, published by the Deep Foundations Institute.  A total of 22 indicator piles were installed on the project using the pile driving analyzer to monitor the pile behavior. Five load tests were performed: two axial Statnamic, two lateral Statnamic, and one static axial. The results of the test pile program established driving criteria for production piles that included end of drive blow counts and pile tip elevations with an appropriate allowance for setup.

 

Click on the image below or go to our Publications page.

Test Pile Program to Determine Axial Capacity and Pile Setup for the Biloxi Bay Bridge_ThompsonHeldSaye - DFI Journal Vol3-May09

 

The bridge was recently featured on the cover of Civil Engineering Magazine along with a feature article by Pat Cassity, P.E., S.E. of Parsons Transportation Group.  Source: ASCE

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Foundation Drilling article (May 2009): Drilled Shaft Loadtests in Limestone by Dan and Robert

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The May 2009 issue of Foundation Drilling had an article by Dan and Robert summarizing the recent research on drilled shafts socketed into rock for the Southeast Chapter of ADSC .

The article has been posted to our Publications Page.  The full report is located here, for those looking for a little light reading. 

A test site has been selected for Atlanta in the Piedmont formation.  Check back here or at the project page for updates as things move forward.

 

Nashville site shaft excavation

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kcICON Bond Bridge Update – Drilled Shafts Complete!

UPDATE (5/19/09): Here is an article the Kansas City Star on-line.  It has links to photos and video.
Main Pylon under construction for Bond Bridge, Kansas City, MO
Main Pylon under construction for Bond Bridge, Kansas City, MO

Work by DBA is all but compete on the kcICON project.  All drilled shafts have been installed and base grouted. Construction of the shafts went very well, with no significant issues.  Hayes Drilling installed all of the land-based shafts.  AFT performed all of the base grouting.

The main pylon in the river continues to take shape.  It won’t be long before PCC will have it looking like a bridge!

Paul has been “enjoying” observing drilled shafts at night and base grouting during the day.  A collection of some of his photos from the last bits of shaft construction are below.  He got some great shots of the pylon, including some out in the river.

More pictures here.

Previous post here.